Reviews

TruthScript Reviews: “It’s Not Like Being Black” by Voddie Baucham

Justin Puckett

Author Stephen Baskerville’s words ring true:

“The Sexual Revolution, it is now apparent, has been about much more than simply discarding sexual inhibitions and restrictions. Like all revolutions, it has been driven from the start by revolutionaries seeking power.” It’s Not Like Being Black, pp. 78

I agree with John Piper who said he believes every man is given a burden by God for their time. For some people, it’s church unity or family life. For others, false teachers and the heresy de jour of today. For Dr. Voddie Baucham, his burden appears to be the racial and sexual issues in our culture.

I do not know him personally, but like anyone who finds themselves burdened by an issue, I am sure Voddie wishes he didn’t have to keep writing and talking about these things. Based on his earlier books I imagine he would prefer to write more on biblical Fatherhood and raising a Christian family. Alas, here we are.

Such burdens become wearisome. Without relenting, they remind you of their weight, bearing down around your neck. The ring becomes heavier at the foot of the mountain you are so desperately trying to ascend. At any moment, you could take that burdensome yoke off, and simply sit on the side of the trail waiting for your rescue flight out.

But God, in His infinite wisdom and strength, does not release you of your burden so easily. His power is made perfect in our weakness. Though moments of rest are needed, you are compelled to keep moving forward by the Spirit of God (or Sam Gamgee). Some things are just worth the fight.

A Book Such as This

One may wonder, as I did at first, why do we need another book on this topic? It’s all in the news, blogs, articles, podcasts, in sermons; it’s everywhere, why another? I believe the answer is simply because we don’t get it yet.

Despite all the slew of answers offered, we still have the United Methodist Church making heretical decisions on the matter all the while the SBC continues to play footsie with it. Large swaths of the evangelical church in the West are indifferent about it, too. So once again, someone must stand up with the bullhorn and proclaim the truth— again—until we get it.

For those of us who do get it, we must remain vigilant and up to date. Tomorrow’s “Daily Clown” newspaper is sure to be more ludicrous than yesterday’s, and the latest dissertation more racist than the last. Books like this one help us follow the regressive nature of our culture and their thinking and equip us to counteract.

On the surface, this book may seem redundant in its topic, but few books have so clearly and disturbingly revealed the evil behind the current sexual and cultural revolution of our day.

The Details

If you’re not familiar with Voddie Baucham, you should be. As one of the most sound Christian voices of our time, he is a force to be reckoned with. He is a father, pastor, apologist, professor, and author who knows what time it is.

This book is typical of Voddie Baucham. Profound without being too lengthy. Easy to understand without lacking substance. The book is unapologetically apologetic as Voddie masterfully takes common arguments made by supporters of this movement, and utterly refutes them with logic and the Word of God, including the receipts of 358 citations.

If you are familiar with his works, everything you expect from him is here, minus the usual comedic quips which I believe shows the seriousness of this book. No time for joking.

At just under 250 pages, it is an easy (grammar and structure-wise, not subject), short read and is a good book for those who just do not have the time, or maybe even the interest, to go after far more lengthy, academic-type books.

The Low Down

While the title leaves you wondering at first, halfway through the introduction the subject of the book becomes quite clear. Voddie wants to destroy the idea that sexual orientation and the social struggles that come with the alphabet soup ideology are “not like being black.”

Whereas ethnicity and physical appearance in skin color are good things in the creation of God’s world, sexual deviance is behavior that rebels against God’s creation. One is the true, good, and beautiful design of God. The other is a sociocultural construct; an utter rejection of what is true, good, and beautiful.

Voddie points out that the Supreme Court ruling of Obergefell in 2016 opened the floodgates by portraying sexual identity as being “immutable”, or something that doesn’t change. Therefore, denying individuals to pursue their sexual desires no matter how wicked, is a denial of fundamental rights and liberties, just like slavery. This brought the trope, “Gay is the new black”, therefore making anyone (i.e. Christians) who rejects this idea, a bigot and comparable to a racist.

The problem with this thinking is that hatred of the good way God created a person (i.e. racism, sexism, etc.) is sinful. However, hatred of a sin which rebels against God’s good creation is the very definition of righteousness.

Let love be without hypocrisy—by abhorring what is evil, clinging to what is good” – Romans 12:9

Voddie illustrates this in a historic court case between a white man and a black woman (the way God instituted marriage, one man and one woman), who married and were essentially banished from their state of Virginia because they were of different skin color. Why was this wrong? Because the state was redefining marriage. Genesis 2:24 does not stipulate race or ethnicity, only biological sex.

Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother, and cleave to his wife, and they shall become one flesh.” – Genesis 2:24 This court case ironically paved the way for the state to again redefine marriage (the very thing that made the previous case abhorrent) by legalizing same-sex marriage, except this time you are the bigot if you speak out against it.

Hit the Lights

As I read this book, two things struck me.

One, the topic of this book is heavy and uncomfortable. Similar to the horrors of abortion, to some extent we must resist the temptation to close our eyes and plug our ears and pretend it doesn’t exist.

Some may say they don’t want to know because it will just make them sick and angry. Well, brother or sister, you should be sick and angry. Our lack of righteous anger toward the wickedness in our culture is the only thing keeping the dragon alive. God cannot and does not turn a blind eye to any atrocity and we are commanded to hate what He hates.“The fear of Yahweh is to hate evil; Pride and arrogance and the evil way And the mouth of perverted words, I hate.” Proverbs 8:13

Neutrality is a Myth

This brings us to a word of caution, Voddie does peel back the cover over the tomb of the evil behind the LGBTQ movement, and what’s inside is more horrifying than expected. If you have been living in a cave or had your head in the ground, this book will be a massive red pill and may bring a lot of shock, but I think that’s the whole point.

As the light of truth exposes the depravity of the fathers and children of this movement, you are met with brazen wickedness.

Men like the fraudulent Alfred Kinsey, the pedophile, sadomasochist, voyeur. And John Money, the pedophile (noticing a trend?), child mutilator, and arguably murderer. There is also the unashamed lying, manipulative, brainwashing propagandists Marshall Kirk and Hunter Madsen. Along with the push of current organizations like the North American Man-boy Love Association, whose motto is “Eight is too late” (page 122), who are seeking to legitimize their sexual behavior towards children under the banner of LGBTQIA2S+ (yes, the acronym is that long now).

Voddie points out:

“All arguments about ultimate truth are, in effect, religious arguments. The devout secularist is not free of theological presuppositions. He is as dogmatic as I am. The difference is that he does not acknowledge his presuppositions. Instead, he pretends to be a dispassionate seeker of truth. That, dear reader, is a lie! We are all making religious arguments, and I refuse to set mine aside. To do so would be intellectual suicide.”

Voddie Baucham, It’s Not Like Being Black, page 124

The time has come to stop having a live and let live, social libertarian “you’re free to do whatever you want so long as it doesn’t bother me” attitude. There is no neutral ground on these issues. The fault lines are cracking, and the time to pick which side you stand on is now.

Someone should write a book about that.

Voddie warns:

“I am not just grasping at extremes, but making a point that should be obvious: If we decide what we will or will not condone in the realm of human sexuality without the benefit of a set standard, there is no limit to the levels of debauchery and chaos into which we will sink.”

Voddie Baucham, It’s Not Like Being Black, pages 123-124

No more can we view this as some benign “idea” that only affects the few who follow it, but a metastasizing philosophy and worldview that is spreading rapidly, and being pumped into every facet of our culture, with the purpose of training children to be the next generation, and destroying your religion

The proof is in what the activists openly write. Here is a quote by Steve Warren submitted to the leading gay publication in 1987, The Advocate, called “A Warning to Homophobes”:

“You can either let us marry people of the same sex, or better yet abolish marriage altogether. You will be expected to offer ceremonies that bless our sexual arrangements. You will also instruct your people in homosexual as well as heterosexual behavior, and you will go out of your way to make certain that homosexual youths are allowed to date, attend religious functions together, openly display affection, and enjoy each other’s sexuality without embarrassment or guilt. If any of the older people in your midst object, you will deal with them sternly, making certain they renounce their ugly and ignorant homophobia or suffer public humiliation. You will also make certain that…laws are passed forbidding discrimination against homosexuals and heavy punishments are assessed. Finally, we will in all likelihood want to expunge a number of passages from your Scriptures and rewrite others, eliminating preferential treatment of marriage and using words that will allow for homosexual interpretations of passages describing biblical lovers such as Ruth and Boaz or Solomon and the Queen of Sheba.

Warning: If all these things do not come to pass quickly, we will subject Orthodox Jews and Christians to the most sustained hatred and vilification in recent memory. We have captured the liberal establishment and the press. We have already beaten you on a number of battlefields. You have neither the faith nor the strength to fight us, so you might as well surrender now.”

Voddie Baucham, It’s Not Like Being Black, pages 48-49

I wondered if such threats and claims stir up fear in a believer. Clearly that is Warren’s intention. Christian, this type of rhetoric should only fan the flames of faith and energize you to righteous war with the Sword of the Gospel.

Warren’s words are as blasphemous as they are ignorant. Our Scriptures and confessions are dyed with the blood of not only the men who wrote them but also the martyrs who came after. Thousands of years have tested our faith and sealed it with the fires and tortures of tyrants and the infiltration of heretics. It has only purified and strengthened our doctrine. His threats are as stale as the Church is old, and any persecution will only embolden and grow the Church of God. His words, and everyone else fighting for this movement, will be forgotten and become the laughingstock of future generations once this is placed under the feet of Christ, but the Word of God will remain forever.

T-R-O-U-B-L-E

The second thought that came to mind: this book is going to cause trouble. There are other books that deal with similar issues today, but they are not as accessible as this one. I believe with the relatively short length and ease of reading, combined with Voddie’s well-earned reputation as a theologian and apologist, this book will find its way into the hands of more pastors, fathers, lay teachers, and congregants.

This will inevitably cause the vampires of the crypt to shield themselves and hiss as more light exposes their evil deeds. The slander and attacks towards the author will be ramped up because he is, in his words, “the wrong kind of black man.” A man who refuses to think, speak, and act the way all the wealthy white elite think a black man should. Given the progressive left’s increasing propensity for violence, it’s probably a good thing Voddie moved to Africa.

The result of all this will bring a higher awareness to the church, more conversations at work and at the dinner table, and hopefully, enough outrage that moves a sleepy church to action, bringing God willing, the beginning of change.

The Deacon of God

“At the time of this writing, all public institutions are required to recognize same-sex marriage in their policies; though private institutions have been spared so far, it can’t remain that way for long. The day will come when the full weight of the law will be brought to bear on churches that hold to a biblical view of marriage to obey man’s law rather than God’s law.”

Voddie Baucham, It’s Not Like Being Black, page 89

Since this topic has obvious legal ramifications that we are all too familiar with, Voddie spends some time dealing with a biblical perspective on the role of government. Again, there is much talk about this now and it may seem like a tired subject, but the fact is that so many still do not understand or are in opposition to what Scripture clearly teaches.

I find Voddie’s approach, not surprisingly, well articulated through the use of both biblical and historical examples. He also does well to show what happens when we blindly submit ourselves to governing authorities without first consulting scripture and what God has to say. This very idea is what took place in Nazi Germany.

“Many wondered how men could have done that to their fellow human beings. Few were moved by the common refrain, “We were just following orders.” We knew then, as we know now, that some orders should not be followed.”

Voddie Baucham, It’s Not Like Being Black, page 137

The result of our silence (read about the silence of the Lutheran Church in Germany during that time) can certainly become as tragic as that, but Baucham later lays out the devastating cultural and generational rot that comes as a result, best exemplified by this example:

“If the only thing required for the state to recognize a union is a “committed and loving relationship” between people “raising families just like [heterosexual/monogamous] couples,” then we need to brace ourselves for more stories like that of Ari, Gwendolyn, and Brenifer, a nonbinary throuple in Florida rais- ing two genderless children.”

Voddie Baucham, It’s Not Like Being Black, page 144

Abhor What is Evil, Cling to What is Good

This book finishes by contrasting the wickedness previously laid out, with the beauty and goodness of God’s intended design for marriage and sex. It is one thing to know what you should not do, and another to know what you should do. Neither is sufficient on their own for long-term change.

Voddie also lays out the real world and the physical consequences of ignoring God’s designed ways. Many times we consider only the spiritual aspect, but sin has natural consequences in the form of bodily functions, physical deformities and mutilation, an untold number of diseases, and even death. To ignore these and stay silent is neither right nor good, and a failure to love our neighbor as ourselves.

He explains:

“Sex is a glorious gift from our good God. In its proper context, it is holy. Outside of that context, however, it becomes something altogether different—something unholy, unhealthy, unnatural, and dishonorable. Codifying such relationships into law is the ultimate act of rebellion against a holy God.”

Voddie Baucham, It’s Not Like Being Black, page 177

The Power of God unto Salvation

This book also finishes with examples of two prominent, former homosexuals: Rosaria Butterfield, and Christopher Yuan. These two individuals and the thousands they represent, are shining trophies of God’s power and grace, and show how this issue ultimately is a sin problem, and therefore a heart issue only the Great Physician can cure.

We must study what the other side is doing. We also must believe what they say. We must have counterarguments that are not only logical but biblical, but we must also remember our goal is not to win arguments but to save souls.

The preached Gospel in the ears of a repentant sinner is the supreme argument that destroys every lofty idea and empty philosophy. We ultimately do not fight against flesh and blood, but spiritual powers, and so a spiritual sword must be used.

Final Words

This is a must-read for most Christians. I say most, because if you are well-read and studied in this particular area, while still valuable in its content, it may not necessarily bring anything new to the table.

Due to the content of this book, this is not one for family devotion time! It is not crude in any way, but it is certainly not appropriate for children, possibly younger teens, or adults who act like either. Even for many adults, the content may be shocking; read it in small sections.

I am thankful for Voddie Baucham’s diligence in this area, and for writing in such a clear and concise manner, and therefore, I am certain the Lord will bless his work.

May this book bring us not only to our knees but on our feet emboldened and ready to make a defense.

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